Mar 24, 2010

>> what's inside: Alexandra Becket + Greg Steinberg


Yesterday afternoon I sipped iced tea with textile artist Alexandra Becket in her fabulous newly remodeled house in West Hollywood. She and her fiancĂ© Greg spent the better part of last year working on stripping walls, razing the garage, demo-ing the tiled roof and putting in a new kitchen, bathrooms, landscape—and of course scouring estate sales and flea markets for those perfect accents. He loves Tiki Modern and she loves Mid Century, two styles that happily marry in an L.A. home. While hanging out with Alexandra, I felt like I was hanging with Los Angeles history because she is the granddaughter of Welton Becket, the architect who designed The Capitol Records building, LAX, The Beverly Hilton, The Cinerama Dome...is there a major architectural landmark in L.A. that he didn't design? It was really cool to hear her stories. Thanks Alexandra!

Above photo is a shot of her studio office located in their garage. Becket has sold textile designs to Trina Turk and Anthropologie to name just a few clients. She also has had her artwork displayed at DWR.

Alexandra and Greg landscaped with mostly drought-friendly plants.




The fireplace was painted white when Greg moved into the home in the 1990s, they stripped it and found beautiful 1920s tiling by Ernest Batchelder!

Tiki, the cat, prefers Danish Modern.


A LIFE magazine from 1956 sits in their living room. The cover story is a Palm Springs home that Welton Becket designed for a mechanical engineer. What you're looking at is a rotating sun deck apparatus for even tanning. Ah, the 1950s! Check the dog in the middle!

4 comments:

Amanda said...

Their house is rad. I especially love the picture of her desk with all the colorful textiles.

xx Amanda

priscilla said...

Her textiles are so cool! What is that Pod Lamp in her work room? How big is it? Love it!
Priscilla Woolworth

Rosie Campbell said...

Very cool house. Great post...thanks so much!

www.rosiecampbell.net

seichu said...

My grandfather was an engineer that worked at Welton Becket, and in particular on that rotating sun bed. He spoke of that project on more than one occasion but I never thought I'd get to see a picture of it.